Euro Gears

Next, I drained the radiator. This is the reason why you have to remove the gas tank – to get at the radiator cap.

With the gas tank removed you can remove the radiator cap

The radiator drain plug is in the water pipe that is tucked inside of the right frame rail.

Drain plug removed from the radiator water pipe

Next I drained the oil. I was going to change the oil afterwards, so removed all three plugs.

Draining the oil (remove all three plugs)

There is a black oil pipe that connects to the bottom of the outer transmission cover. I removed that next.

Removing the transmission outer cover oil pipe
Transmission outer cover oil pipe removed

Then I removed the lower water connections that lead to the water pump. It connects to the lower edge of the inner transmission cover.

Removing the lower water pipe (don't lose the O-ring)

Next I removed the chrome outer transmission cover.

Removing the bolts on the outer transmission cover
Outside transmission cover removed

Then I removed the upper water pipe that connects to the top of the inner transmission cover.

Loosening the clamp on the upper water pipe

Finally I was able to remove the inner transmission cover.

Removing the bolts on the inner transmission cover

If you read Ron’s article, he talks about how tough it is to loosen the nuts holding the transfer gears. They are tight! I used my impact wrench and it made quick work of it. Ron also talks about making shims to eliminate a tiny bit of play between the gear and the nut. There was a little bit of play with the original gears too, so I didn’t add any shims and the bike has been fine.

Removing the nut on the forward transfer gear
Removing the nut on the rear transfer gear

Time for a coffee break.

Stripped down

The worst part of the entire job (and I am not kidding) is removing the small shim that is under the speedo sensor. You need to remove the shim if you want your speedometer to work after swapping the gears. The speedo is driven off of the rear transfer gear. The new gear is slightly smaller in diameter and the shim needs to be removed so that it will be positioned close enough to the gear. I had to remove the battery and damn near every other piece of plastic to get to the allen bolts that hold it on. What a PITA…

Battery removed
Getting at the !@#$%^&*() speed sensor

Assembly is just the reverse. I made sure that the mating surfaces of the inner and out transmission covers were perfectly clean and smooth. I did not want to button everything back up only to discover a leak.

And the results were worth the effort and expense. The engine is turning noticeably fewer RPMs and just purrs along at interstate speeds. However, with all of that power on tap, I still find myself reaching for that 6th gear occassionally… 🙂

Please follow & like this blog
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Twitter
RSS
Google+
http://focusontheride.com/euro-gears/

admin

A Goldwing rider from Jacksonville, FL.

17 thoughts on “Euro Gears

  1. Is it absolutely necessary to remove the tank?

    Did you not have to use a “Gear Lock” since using an impact?

    Thanks

    1. Yes, you need to remove the gas tank becuase you need to get at the radiator cap in order to refill the coolant. I did not use a gear lock. I left the bike in gear and with the rear wheel on the ground there is enough resistance to keep the gears from turning when using the impact wrench to loosen the nuts holding the transfer gears.

  2. All this time later how do you feel about Euro Gears?
    Is the acceleration/grunt still decent from 3rd on compared
    to before?
    Great site, pics and travels.
    Well done.

    1. Sorry for taking so long to reply. I still love the Euro gears. They definitely bring the RPMs down when you are cruising on the highway. But I still occasionally reach for that non-existent 6th gear! And first gear is still too steep. I don’t know why Kawaski did that becuase the motor has PLENTY of torque. The roll-on in third or fourth is still tremendous. Lots of grunt, you still have to hold on! It’s never a problem leaving others behind! Thanks for the complement on the site.

  3. I just installed euro gears on my vn 2000 Ltd this week and instead of dismanteling all the plastic I cut down a small allen wrench so It could fit under the plastic box , finished remouving the allen bolt with pliers and got the small sim out from under the speed sensor with no trouble . THanks for all the pictures and information it made my job easyier

  4. Thank you for the detail on the gear change.
    I just installed my Euro Gears on my ’08 2K after waiting almost a month for them to come in. Using your directions and photos were mucho helpful, thanks!.
    I followed Guerin’s advice and instead of remove the battery box, I too cut down and bent a cheap 5mm Hex wrench. You only get a quarter turn at a time but it beats disassembling the battery box. The whole process took me the better part of a day, but I took my time and cleaned all the gasket surfaces and assembled it carefully. I left the bike on the ground and also used an impact wrench on the gear nuts. Yeah, they were tight!
    Haven’t rode a long distance yet but I can feel the difference already. The shifts are a little more crisp and a bit less “clunky” so all in all I think it’s worth it.

    Thanks!

  5. I have read on other another website that both shafts are the same diameter and that the transfer gears can also be reversed giving a total of four different drive ratios 42:50, 44:48, 48:44, and 50:42. I am wondering if anyone knows how to address the correcting the gap on the speedo pickup if going smaller than the 48 tooth gear on the rear shaft. With Arizona speed limits going as high as 75mph and traffic speed sometimes approaching 90mph, I think I would like the advantage of running 48:44 on the transfer gears. Thanks for any info.

    1. http://www.powersportswarehouse.com/p/parts#%2fKawasaki%2fVN2000A6F_Vulcan_2000_%28European%29_%282006%29%2fTRANSMISSION%2fVN2000A6F|~EU-2006%2fI13I1313E1361

      Part # 16085 GEAR,TRANSFER,44T
      Part # 16085A GEAR,TRANSFER,48T
      These are the Euro gears

      You will also need the 2 gaskets for Inner and Outer transmission.
      http://www.powersportswarehouse.com/p/parts#/Kawasaki/VN2000A6F_Vulcan_2000_%28European%29_%282006%29/RIGHT_ENGINE_COVER%28S%29/VN2000A6F|~EU-2006/I13I1313E1436

      Part # 11061
      Part # 11061A

  6. Thank you so much for the great pics,and information, I need to do this ASAP! What Rpm are you spinine at around 80mph,my stock gearing is driving me crazy, I have a cobra 2 into one exaust,the noise and the vibration are crazy at that speed, other than that, I love this bike.

  7. Hi folks,
    I reversed the euro gears on my Euro VN2000, still having plenty of torque. I love that gear ratio a lot, feels like cuising at idle at 100 km/h.
    Another advantage: the speedo is now 100% accurat.
    Thanks for that nice tutorial!
    Regards from Germany
    Frank

    1. One more thing: no need to take the exhaust apart.
      Just loosen the 4 bolts at the cylinders, then the bolts at the frame and take the whole eshaust assembly off the bike.
      Saves you a lot of time.
      Cheers
      Frank

      1. Frank” How did you get the speed sensor close enough to the rear gear to work right? Is the Euro bike sensor longer? Thanks” Wayne. AuGres Michigan.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *